Hello! I’m African and I transitioned to natural hair (chopped, grew, relaxed once then grew it natural) two years ago. My hair grows really fast, is curly and my scalp is sensitive and itchy – it’s been so since my teenage years. When i braid or weave my hair, it itches a lot more especially just after & in the first week, so I can’t carry it for long as it gets rough quickly. The same for fixing weaves. As a result I try to avoid doing those but I end up just tying my hair in a bun/ponytail and the curly short strands are flying around which is kind of boring and not suited to the work environment. Plus! My hair is grey, I have grey strands all over intermingled with (more) black (this is hereditary). I haven’t really taken care of my hair well, ‘cos it’s resilient () but I want to change that now – I’d really like to know what can take away the itching and generally how to take care of my hair
Sulfates are in 90% of foaming and lathering products as well as in skin and hair care products as fillers. Sulfates are frequently described on labels as “comes from” or “derived from” coconut in an effort to portray them as innocuous even though they are known skin irritants, hormone and endocrine disruptors and suspected carcinogens and gene mutagens. Any chemical capable of mutating genes deserves our attention! Sulfates are among the most commonly used because they are inexpensive and effective at cutting through oil. On labels, look for sodium laureth sulfate (SLES), ammonium laureth sulfate (ALES), sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and ammonium lauryl sulfate (ALS)… and don’t be fooled by the coconut references.
"Healthy living" to most people means both physical and mental health are in balance or functioning well together in a person. In many instances, physical and mental health are closely linked, so that a change (good or bad) in one directly affects the other. Consequently, some of the tips will include suggestions for emotional and mental "healthy living."
Trying to decide what you're going to eat in the morning while you're rushing to get out the door is a recipe for diet disaster. Take 10 minutes tonight to plan out all your breakfasts for the week. Having a weekly nutrition plan will increase your likelihood of following through and eating breakfast every morning. (The 30-Day Meal Prep Challenge covers all the basics.)
Well, I’m just saying thank you for the previous advice. So far on his journey I’ve successfully gone through 4 month and about 22 days of being natural. Now, at this very moment, my hair is about half my pinky finger or a lil more and I have then plat, pus my mom put some rubber bands in m hair (against the hairdressers wishes), oh, and my new hairdresser also died my hair black, because my hair is multi colored (black,brown & goldish red ), she also told me that all I needed to use was Wild Growth hair oil and keep plating my hair…and i think this artical is helpful not only to my hair but my skin…thank u
Weight gain has been associated with excessive consumption of fats, (added) sugars, refined carbohydrates in general, and alcohol consumption.[citation needed] Depression, stress or boredom may also contribute to weight increase,[5] and in these cases, individuals are advised to seek medical help. A 2010 study found that dieters who got a full night's sleep lost more than twice as much fat as sleep-deprived dieters.[6][7]
Hello, I have been natural for about 6 months now and have gotten pretty good growth from what i can see but my problem is with building up the self confidence i need to actually wear my beautiful natural hair. I did the big chop and before the big chop have never had short hair i’m 22 and feel as though if i where to wear my coils that society would view it as ” inappropriate” or that the women at my job would view it as unprofessional. Any advise would be really helpful .Thankyou!!
Many patients will be in pain and have a loss of appetite after surgery.[26] Part of the body's response to surgery is to direct energy to wound healing, which increases the body's overall energy requirements.[26] Surgery affects nutritional status indirectly, particularly during the recovery period, as it can interfere with wound healing and other aspects of recovery.[26][30] Surgery directly affects nutritional status if a procedure permanently alters the digestive system.[26] Enteral nutrition (tube feeding) is often needed.[26] However a policy of 'nil by mouth' for all gastrointestinal surgery has not been shown to benefit, with some suggestion it might hinder recovery.[38]
My advice to you: Look for ways to incorporate more protection into your natural hair regimen. Be sure that you’re being gentle with your hair at all times. I also recommend finding a few protective hairstyles that you like and frequently incorporate them into your natural hair regimen, so you can protect the ends of your hair. A significant component to growing long hair (or more accurately retaining what you’ve already grown) is mitigating hair breakage to retain the hair that you currently have and protective styling improves your ability to accomplish this goal.
If you decide to transition, you won’t begin to see a difference in your hair until you reach the point of when you’d typically get a relaxer. What happens is that your new growth, which is your natural hair, will continue to grow out as it normally would. However, this time, you won’t get a relaxer. During your transition, you will take care/maintain both your natural hair/new growth and your relaxed ends.
Many patients will be in pain and have a loss of appetite after surgery.[26] Part of the body's response to surgery is to direct energy to wound healing, which increases the body's overall energy requirements.[26] Surgery affects nutritional status indirectly, particularly during the recovery period, as it can interfere with wound healing and other aspects of recovery.[26][30] Surgery directly affects nutritional status if a procedure permanently alters the digestive system.[26] Enteral nutrition (tube feeding) is often needed.[26] However a policy of 'nil by mouth' for all gastrointestinal surgery has not been shown to benefit, with some suggestion it might hinder recovery.[38]
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