Hello my name is Terrianna I am 18 years old and attending college (staying on campus). I need hair help. I’ve done the big chop a 2 years ago. My hair is thin, fragile and brittle and very dry it feels like a desert island! I CAN NOT spend ALOT of money.. If I know that the product will not work like people says it does… I also know that my hair is not like everyone’s .. I do not get relaxer! I need hair help. IMMEDIATELY!


For those of you just starting out on the natural hair care journey, you are bound to see “No ‘Poo” everywhere you go. Don’t worry, it does NOT have anything to do with your bowels. It’s a short term for “No Shampoo.” The most common approach to No ‘Poo is using baking soda for washing and an apple cider vinegar rinse. I personally do not like this method as the baking soda was so harsh on my scalp. I later learned that it’s because it’s not in line with our scalp’s natural pH. That’s why I created my pH Balanced Shampoo recipe. Some people, however, LOVE the baking soda method… and I say, “If’ it’s not broke, don’t fix it.”  If you still haven’t found the best method for you, stick with me. I have lots of ideas in the second part of this post.

I had a long conversation with a fellow 3C-er at Curlfest about this product. This styler can be used for almost anything and everything, but if you’re looking for smooth, stretched curls, the key is knowing how to use it. Liberally apply this from roots to ends on soaking wet hair (not damp!) and it’ll lock in whatever twist-out your heart desires with zero stickiness.
At the base of every hair follicle, right at the scalp, are sebaceous glands. These get a bad rap as most people complain about greasy or oily hair. Chances are, if you’re using conventional hair products, your stripping the natural healthy oils from these sebaceous glands that actually help to protect, nourish and fight against infection. The more chemicals you put on your scalp, but more you harm the sebaceous glands, which in turns gets you reaching for more shampoo, conditioner, defrizzer, hair color and so on.
Hello! I’m African and I transitioned to natural hair (chopped, grew, relaxed once then grew it natural) two years ago. My hair grows really fast, is curly and my scalp is sensitive and itchy – it’s been so since my teenage years. When i braid or weave my hair, it itches a lot more especially just after & in the first week, so I can’t carry it for long as it gets rough quickly. The same for fixing weaves. As a result I try to avoid doing those but I end up just tying my hair in a bun/ponytail and the curly short strands are flying around which is kind of boring and not suited to the work environment. Plus! My hair is grey, I have grey strands all over intermingled with (more) black (this is hereditary). I haven’t really taken care of my hair well, ‘cos it’s resilient () but I want to change that now – I’d really like to know what can take away the itching and generally how to take care of my hair
Hair-care devotees know all about the importance of a good deep conditioner, but hot oil treatments don't get nearly enough love. While you can create an effective one for yourself by mixing your favorite oils, this treatment from Taliah Waajid eliminates all of the guesswork that comes with homemade concoctions. Just distribute a decent amount of this throughout your cleansed hair, throw on a shower cap, and sit under a hooded dryer for 15 to 20 minutes so it can deeply penetrate your hair shaft.
Hair breakage is the most common cause of hair loss. Tight hairstyles (ex. tight ponytails and braids) can break off the hair and damage the hair follicle. If your hair constantly breaks you will need to identify exactly what’s causing the breakage and eliminate the culprit to prevent further breakage. The most common causes of breakage are heat, harsh chemicals, tight hairstyles and rough treatment.
Weight loss occurs when the body is expending more energy in work and metabolism than it is absorbing from food or other nutrients. It will then use stored reserves from fat or muscle, gradually leading to weight loss. For athletes seeking to improve performance or to meet required weight classification for participation in a sport, it is not uncommon to seek additional weight loss even if they are already at their ideal body weight. Others may be driven to lose weight to achieve an appearance they consider more attractive. However, being underweight is associated with health risks such as difficulty fighting off infection, osteoporosis, decreased muscle strength, trouble regulating body temperature and even increased risk of death.[3]
Low-calorie diets are also referred to as balanced percentage diets. Due to their minimal detrimental effects, these types of diets are most commonly recommended by nutritionists. In addition to restricting calorie intake, a balanced diet also regulates macronutrient consumption. From the total number of allotted daily calories, it is recommended that 55% should come from carbohydrates, 15% from protein, and 30% from fats with no more than 10% of total fat coming from saturated forms.[citation needed] For instance, a recommended 1,200 calorie diet would supply about 660 calories from carbohydrates, 180 from protein, and 360 from fat. Some studies suggest that increased consumption of protein can help ease hunger pangs associated with reduced caloric intake by increasing the feeling of satiety.[4] Calorie restriction in this way has many long-term benefits. After reaching the desired body weight, the calories consumed per day may be increased gradually, without exceeding 2,000 net (i.e. derived by subtracting calories burned by physical activity from calories consumed). Combined with increased physical activity, low-calorie diets are thought to be most effective long-term, unlike crash diets, which can achieve short-term results, at best. Physical activity could greatly enhance the efficiency of a diet. The healthiest weight loss regimen, therefore, is one that consists of a balanced diet and moderate physical activity.[citation needed]

Trying to decide what you're going to eat in the morning while you're rushing to get out the door is a recipe for diet disaster. Take 10 minutes tonight to plan out all your breakfasts for the week. Having a weekly nutrition plan will increase your likelihood of following through and eating breakfast every morning. (The 30-Day Meal Prep Challenge covers all the basics.) 
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