Hi! I found this article to be very helpful. I’ve been thinking about going natural for awhile now but I have a few concerns because I’m on a few medications that affect hair growth. When I first began the medication my former stylist cut my hair (which was longer at the time) but ever since then my hair hasn’t been able to grow nearly as much. Do you think going natural would help?
Cleansing with harsh shampoos can strip the hair of its natural oils leading to dry, thirsty, and unhappy strands. This detangling co-wash — which is made with natural oils and preservatives — works on thin, thick, or curly hair and removes icky impurities (goodbye spin class sweat) without leaving strands totally dehydrated. Pro tip: It's best used between shampoos.
The more muscle you have, the higher and hotter your metabolism runs. In fact, strength training can help boost your metabolism by as much as 15 percent! A faster metabolism means you'll burn more calories all day long (even sitting in front of your computer) and get lean and toned faster. (The other benefits of lifting weights will also convince you to get to the weight room.)
"When going out for fast food, I used to get the large-size value meal. Now, I satisfy a craving by ordering just one item: a small order of fries or a six-piece box of chicken nuggets. So far, I've shaved off 16 pounds in seven weeks, and I'm on track to being thinner than my high school self for my 10-year reunion later this year." —Miranda Jarrell, Birmingham, AL
It has been shown that micronutrient dietary supplement consumption results in a lower body weight and resting metabolic rate in men and lower hunger level in females,[51] but there are no sufficient studies to assess their roles in preventing weight regain after weight loss. Only the Nachtigal cohort study revealed that long-term use of vitamins B6 and B12, and chromium were significantly associated with lower weight gain.[52]
I agree with David (9th July comment) with regard to diet. Whole grains can indeed have the effect of spiking blood sugar (whole grain bread as just one example) and creating gut inflammation, and therefore low-grade, sub-acute inflammation in general. This is the biggest contributor to chronic disease that we are facing, long-term inflammation. The standard food pyramid is, in my opinion, all wrong. I believe we should eat a more Mediterranean diet, and minimise the grain-based carbohydrates, and the sugars. Then we are considerably further down the track towards a healthy diet that promotes longevity. Of course, all of the other factors mentioned are important as well, but what we put into our mouths is probably the most important, given the skyrocketing rates of obesity first world countries are facing, and now even asian countries as well, who are well and truly catching up.
If you decide to transition, you won’t begin to see a difference in your hair until you reach the point of when you’d typically get a relaxer. What happens is that your new growth, which is your natural hair, will continue to grow out as it normally would. However, this time, you won’t get a relaxer. During your transition, you will take care/maintain both your natural hair/new growth and your relaxed ends.

An increase in fiber intake is also recommended for regulating bowel movements. Other methods of weight loss include use of drugs and supplements that decrease appetite, block fat absorption, or reduce stomach volume. Bariatric surgery may be indicated in cases of severe obesity. Two common bariatric surgical procedures are gastric bypass and gastric banding.[13] Both can be effective at limiting the intake of food energy by reducing the size of the stomach, but as with any surgical procedure both come with their own risks[14] that should be considered in consultation with a physician. Dietary supplements, though widely used, are not considered a healthy option for weight loss.[15] Many are available, but very few are effective in the long term.[16]

My advice to you: Start a natural hair journal and begin documenting everything that you do to your hair. This will help you understand over a period of time what works and what doesn’t work for your hair. The key is to focus on what works for your hair and start to eliminate the things that don’t work. This process will help you select the right hair products and finalize your natural hair regimen. Several women have seen great success by openly documenting their natural hair journey by starting a natural hair blog.


We've been conditioned to think that sulfates, parabens, silicones, and [insert unpronounceable chemical here] are part of the bargain if you want great hair. The good news is that's not so. With consumers becoming increasingly ingredient-conscious, hair-care brands have been stepping up to harness the power of good 'ol Mother Nature to create products that have an ingredient list you can actually read. And your hair is poised to reap all the amazing benefits. The days of worrying about whether the multisyllabic, consonant-heavy contents of your shampoo and conditioner can be long gone, folks — if you know where to look. Now, before you put in the work, relax, because we've already done it for you. We've rounded up some amazing products that will take care of your crown the way nature intended. Read on to find out our favorites, and get to making your hair-care stash a lot greener.
Sunscreens have undergone changes, and the U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) published new requirements that sunscreens needed to meet starting in 2012. Currently, the FDA suggests an effective sunscreen is rated as SPF 30 or higher and has both UVA and UVB protection (protection against ultraviolet waves of types A and B). In most instances, sunscreen needs to be applied every two hours and each time after a person has gone swimming.
My advice to you: Look for ways to incorporate more protection into your natural hair regimen. Be sure that you’re being gentle with your hair at all times. I also recommend finding a few protective hairstyles that you like and frequently incorporate them into your natural hair regimen, so you can protect the ends of your hair. A significant component to growing long hair (or more accurately retaining what you’ve already grown) is mitigating hair breakage to retain the hair that you currently have and protective styling improves your ability to accomplish this goal.
Thirteen year old Lexi Proctor wrote a book that encouraged self-love among young girls, Curly Girls Love Your Curls. After seeing the impact of that book, Lexi and her mother Monica were inspired to create a line of hair care products for all the Curlanistas of the world. With Lexi’s background as a STEM student, they took their homemade concoctions and developed a hair care line to help girls’ curls pop non-stop!
I really like the article could you put in some protective hairstyles that are authorized by the military? The reason alot of women serving in the military don’t go natural and suffer breakage from constantly wearing braids and weaves is because we think we have no choice. Yet our hair must be off the collar and can’t be viewed by superiors to be bulky or unkempt. ANy help you can lend to this would be appreciated.

There are many treatments for alcoholism. But the crucial first step to recovery is for the individual to admit there is a problem and make a commitment to address the alcoholism issue. The 12-step-style self-help programs, pioneered by Alcoholics Anonymous, can be one effective treatment. Psychologists and related professionals have developed programs to help individuals better handle emotional stresses and avoid behaviors that can lead to excess drinking. Support and understanding from family members are often critical for sustained recovery. Medication can be useful for the prevention of relapses and for withdrawal symptoms following acute or prolonged intoxication.
My name is Latrice (aka Ms Lala) and I am here to help you on your hair growth journey.  I have had natural hair for over 12 years.  I grew my hair long with a simple method I call the 3 M’s of Hair Care- Minimize Breakage, Maximize Growth, Maintain Progress.  Take the quiz below to determine where you should start on your journey to long healthy hair.
I’ve been natural for a couple of years now. I get my hair flat ironed now because its easier to maintain but I’ve noticed that my scalp gets severly flaky & dry. I will sometimes put the African Pride oil on my scalp or BB’s super grow. I dont know what else to do to prevent this. My hair also sheds alot. Any suggestions are welcome. And since ive been flat ironing for a while whats the best products to get my curls back?
Also, I forgot to mention stay away from products with Petroleum Jelly, Mineral Oil (liquefied petroleum jelly), paraffin, silicones and sulfates to the best of your ability. A lot of products purporting to be good for our hair list one of the above as (among) the first ingredients in the product, but honestly it is a cheap bulking ingredient that offers no nutritional value to your hair whatsoever. They make for excellent barriers to moisture once applied on your hair/scalp but it’s also tantamount to wrapping yourself in cling film, not allowing your pores to breathe and to be hydrated by the water in the atmosphere.

If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your healthcare provider or 911 immediately. Any mention of products or services is not meant as a guarantee, endorsement, or recommendation of the products, services, or companies. Reliance on any information provided is solely at your own risk. Please discuss any options with your healthcare provider.

This is huge. And, it confirms prior similar research — a lot of prior similar research. A 2017 study using data from the Health and Retirement Study found that people 50 and older who were normal weight, had never smoked, and drank alcohol in moderation lived on average seven years longer. A 2012 mega-analysis of 15 international studies that included over 500,000 participants found that over half of premature deaths were due to unhealthy lifestyle factors such as poor diet, inactivity, obesity, excessive alcohol intake, and smoking. And the list of supporting research goes on.


Eighteen years ago, I was arrested by seven undercover cops, handcuffed and dragged out of my own salon in Texas. I was guilty of the "crime" of braiding hair without a cosmetology license. Today, I'm free. U.S. Judge Sam Sparks ruled that Texas Braiding Laws were unconstitutional. This fight for the right to teach the next generation braiding is today's modern day civil rights movement!
Contrary to what many women think (and what some misguided fitness professionals will tell you), lifting weights will not make you "big and bulky." Women lack the testosterone levels necessary to achieve a significant amount of muscle gain. The truth is that lifting weights will help you get leaner and will increase your bone density, which is critical for the prevention of osteoporosis—a disease affecting 44 million Americans, 80 percent of whom are women. (See: 5 Reasons Lifting Heavy Weights Won't Make You Bulk Up)
In another study, obese adults were assigned to Medifast's meal replacement (low fat, low GI, with a balanced ratio of CHO/Pro) (MD) or a self-selected, isocaloric, food-based meal plan for weight loss and weight maintenance. The amount of weight regain was more in the MD group, but the percentage of participants who kept up their weight in this group was more than in the other group.[15]
Creating a healthy lifestyle doesn't have to mean drastic changes. Making small changes in how you live may seem like a slow process, and it is. You may adapt to change better when it doesn't require you to overhaul your entire life. Just pick one thing and work on that one thing every day, letting the rest of your life and habits stay the same. You may be surprised that those small changes really can make a difference.
I haven’t gone natural yet, but I’m planning too very soon. Right now I’m wearing box braids. Pretty much my whole life I have been doing braids relaxers and weaves. But now I want to go natural and I’m not sure exactly where to start. Should I start by trimming split ends, brushing it all through, moisturizing my scalp, cutting off all my relaxed ends?Between my weaves and braided hairstyles, when my hair is natural for a couple of days, Iv’e noticed that it breaks off a lot becomes flat (after I wash it) and is super dry and incredibly tangled. Should I brush my hair because it’s so tangley? Or should I not because it will tear it out? I’m so lost! HELP!
I wear my hair in cornrows everyday with a wig on top. I will spray Carol’s Daughter hair milk refresher spray on my hair then apply any moisturizing creme I may have to give it moisture. Those cremes could be Cantu leave in conditioner, Carol’s Daughter Black Vanilla hair sheen, Kera Care Butter Cream, or Cantu’s Tea Tree & Jojoba hair & scalp oil.
Hey Kate. Im 16 and I’ve been transitioning since April 2013. The back of my hair is natural but the front still has some relaxed ends. I get braids & leave them in for 2 or 3 months. & I oil my scalp 2 twice a Week. When I take my hair out I usually get blowouts at a Dominican salon & have them cut off some of my ends. This helps you not have to big chop until you have enough growth
I would recommend that you read our How to Go Natural guide, there is a link in the right sidebar. It will show you how to start a regimen, create a journal, and much more. You can also review the resource page (see the navigation menu) to select a set of starter products. After you read through those resources, please us know if you have anymore questions. Finally, good luck. I’m really happy for you and I’m sure you’ll enjoy your natural hair. Take care.
Scalp massagers are a brilliant way to stimulate hair growth and soothe your scalp when it's irritated. This cute, battery-operated one from Vanity Planet has a calming vibration motion that feels like you're getting a professional head massage while using it. Also, since the bristle head is made from soft plastic, you don't have to worry about it tugging at your hair, no matter your texture.

To moisturise the scalp and hair, I would firstly lightly mist both with water (that I’d boiled to purify and allowed to cool prior). It is the water that provides the moisture/the hydrating element which is so important for the hair and helps to minimise breakage. I would then seal that moisture to my hair and scalp with an organic oil, such as virgin avocado or coconut oil (I use the latter because I love the aroma) or even virgin olive oil. You don’t need to use a lot – a little goes a long way. You can part your hair into sections to make this easier, make sure to use a wide-tooth comb to do this. When you are negotiating with two hair textures, standard brushes make it much more likely that your hair will break because of the fine teeth and their ability to snag at the point at which your natural and permed hair meet (the line of demarcation). This is detrimental to those trying to retain their current hair length. Finger detangling is also perfectly fine to separate your hair into sections as needed, and means you can better determine the level of force needed to pry apart your hair without risking misjudging it with a comb and ripping hair out!
Hello! I’m African and I transitioned to natural hair (chopped, grew, relaxed once then grew it natural) two years ago. My hair grows really fast, is curly and my scalp is sensitive and itchy – it’s been so since my teenage years. When i braid or weave my hair, it itches a lot more especially just after & in the first week, so I can’t carry it for long as it gets rough quickly. The same for fixing weaves. As a result I try to avoid doing those but I end up just tying my hair in a bun/ponytail and the curly short strands are flying around which is kind of boring and not suited to the work environment. Plus! My hair is grey, I have grey strands all over intermingled with (more) black (this is hereditary). I haven’t really taken care of my hair well, ‘cos it’s resilient () but I want to change that now – I’d really like to know what can take away the itching and generally how to take care of my hair
Eighteen years ago, I was arrested by seven undercover cops, handcuffed and dragged out of my own salon in Texas. I was guilty of the "crime" of braiding hair without a cosmetology license. Today, I'm free. U.S. Judge Sam Sparks ruled that Texas Braiding Laws were unconstitutional. This fight for the right to teach the next generation braiding is today's modern day civil rights movement!
Last thought, I have a very difficult time trusting people in my hair. When I was on the creme crack it was hard. I had a lot of HORRIBLE experiences. I do not want to go through this with my natural hair that I have been actually paying attention to and learning to love for almost a year now. I do not want someone to mess it up. I worked hard on these 5 inches. Also, I have dusty like brown hair. I want to color it wither a richer brown or maybe black. Is that a bad thing? My natural hair color makes my hair look as if it is dirty, dry, damaged and unhealthy. But, it is not, it just looks that way. It took me to go natural to realize that my hair is not damaged it is just an ugly brown. Can you suggest how to go about finding a naturalist beautician that doesn’t want you to pay with your arm and leg? I live in Anne Arundel County (Maryland near Baltimore).
Using a foam roller to perform self-myofascial release (a fancy way of saying "to massage the connective tissue surrounding your muscles, bones, and tendons") is one of the least expensive yet most effective ways to recover from your workout. By using your own body weight to roll on the foam, you can improve flexibility, function, and performance and reduce injuries. Plus, it feels amazing! (Here's a full guide on how to use a foam roller.)
The information you share, including that which might otherwise be Protected Health Information, to this site is by design open to the public and is not a private, secure service. You should think carefully before disclosing any personal information in any public forum. What you have written may be seen, disclosed to, or collected by third parties and may be used by others in ways we are unable to control or predict, including to contact you or otherwise be used for unauthorized or unlawful purposes. As with any public forum on any site, this information may also appear in third-party search engines like Google, MSN, Yahoo, etc. Your use of this site is governed by Harvard University and its affiliates Terms of Use located at www.health.harvard.edu/privacy-policy and may be amended from time to time.
One way to incorporate more protection into your natural hair journey is to utilize protective hairstyles. A protective hairstyle generally requires minimal upkeep, gives you the opportunity to moisturize as needed, and it keeps the ends of your hair safe and tucked away – protected. You can successfully grow your hair quite long with the appropriate selection of products, proper styling techniques, and general handling/maintenance.
Styling and caring for curly and natural hair can feel like a never-ending science class full of A/B tests, experiments, and controls. Depending on the day, the weather, what position you slept in, and what mood your curls wake up in, the texture and pattern of your hair can drastically change overnight. This is why, when someone with similar hair to your own recommends a product, it can feel like getting the answers to a test.
Many patients will be in pain and have a loss of appetite after surgery.[26] Part of the body's response to surgery is to direct energy to wound healing, which increases the body's overall energy requirements.[26] Surgery affects nutritional status indirectly, particularly during the recovery period, as it can interfere with wound healing and other aspects of recovery.[26][30] Surgery directly affects nutritional status if a procedure permanently alters the digestive system.[26] Enteral nutrition (tube feeding) is often needed.[26] However a policy of 'nil by mouth' for all gastrointestinal surgery has not been shown to benefit, with some suggestion it might hinder recovery.[38]
It has been shown that micronutrient dietary supplement consumption results in a lower body weight and resting metabolic rate in men and lower hunger level in females,[51] but there are no sufficient studies to assess their roles in preventing weight regain after weight loss. Only the Nachtigal cohort study revealed that long-term use of vitamins B6 and B12, and chromium were significantly associated with lower weight gain.[52]
Tanisha – Are you still in the process of transitioning from relaxed to natural hair? You mentioned that you didn’t big chop and still have some hair left, were you referring to relaxed hair (ends)? Just curious if you’re struggling to manage the multiple textures because you still have relaxed hair that hasn’t been chopped off or grown out. Let me know…thanks.
Other factors – There can be other factors that I can’t necessarily account for. It could be a combination of detox, water, ingredients, and method…. but unless I can talk to you face to face, see you mix your ingredients together, check your water, and watch you shower… I won’t necessarily know why something isn’t working for you. (And let’s  be honest, that would be really awkward.)  Ultimately, if you are serious about natural hair care you have to be willing to experiment and keep trying until you find your sweet spot.
We like to focus on taking action during your natural hair journey. You have to implement the things that we discuss to really see improvements in your hair. Taking action is the best way to receive benefit from Curl Centric. We try to thoroughly explain concepts and give you very specific ways to take action. We also encourage you to leave comments on articles and respond to comments and questions from other naturals.
There are many treatments for alcoholism. But the crucial first step to recovery is for the individual to admit there is a problem and make a commitment to address the alcoholism issue. The 12-step-style self-help programs, pioneered by Alcoholics Anonymous, can be one effective treatment. Psychologists and related professionals have developed programs to help individuals better handle emotional stresses and avoid behaviors that can lead to excess drinking. Support and understanding from family members are often critical for sustained recovery. Medication can be useful for the prevention of relapses and for withdrawal symptoms following acute or prolonged intoxication.
At the base of every hair follicle, right at the scalp, are sebaceous glands. These get a bad rap as most people complain about greasy or oily hair. Chances are, if you’re using conventional hair products, your stripping the natural healthy oils from these sebaceous glands that actually help to protect, nourish and fight against infection. The more chemicals you put on your scalp, but more you harm the sebaceous glands, which in turns gets you reaching for more shampoo, conditioner, defrizzer, hair color and so on.
Priority chemicals such as propyl-paraben, butyl-paraben, phthalates, formaldehyde, formaldehyde-donors, or nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs). To truly understand the formulation and the chemicals therein, we also expect full ingredient transparency so we can screen them. This means that generic ingredients like fragrance either need to be natural or have their sub-ingredients listed.
Styling and caring for curly and natural hair can feel like a never-ending science class full of A/B tests, experiments, and controls. Depending on the day, the weather, what position you slept in, and what mood your curls wake up in, the texture and pattern of your hair can drastically change overnight. This is why, when someone with similar hair to your own recommends a product, it can feel like getting the answers to a test.
×