Conditioners are intended to deposit protein or moisture into the hair strand to restore the hair’s strength, give your hair body and to protect your hair against possible breakage. The effects of conditioners are only temporary. The term conditioner is often used to describe many different things. For example, there are finishing rinses, cream rinses, protein conditioners, hot oil treatments, deep conditioning treatments and leave-in conditioners – and I’ve only named a few.
The blueprint is divided into three pillars: (1) foundation, (2) products, and (3) styling and maintenance. Each of these pillars work to help you improve your natural hair journey. This blueprint is intended to be balanced, however depending on your strengths – you may need to spend more time on certain areas of the blueprint to see real improvements in your natural hair.
It has been shown that micronutrient dietary supplement consumption results in a lower body weight and resting metabolic rate in men and lower hunger level in females,[51] but there are no sufficient studies to assess their roles in preventing weight regain after weight loss. Only the Nachtigal cohort study revealed that long-term use of vitamins B6 and B12, and chromium were significantly associated with lower weight gain.[52]
In another study, obese adults were assigned to Medifast's meal replacement (low fat, low GI, with a balanced ratio of CHO/Pro) (MD) or a self-selected, isocaloric, food-based meal plan for weight loss and weight maintenance. The amount of weight regain was more in the MD group, but the percentage of participants who kept up their weight in this group was more than in the other group.[15]
With all the creams, potions, and oils we use to style and maintain our hair, there's bound to be some product buildup — and this micro-exfoliating shampoo (which works on all hair types,) is here to nip it in the bud. Sulfate-free and infused with both charcoal and coconut oil, think of it almost like a juice cleanse for the scalp: The charcoal draws out impurities from the scalp and hair follicles, vegetable-derived micro-exfoliators remove dead skin cells and buildup, and soothing peppermint and spearmint oils give your scalp a nice cooling treat.
I have been a natural for about 3 years now and my hair looks like I just big chopped it. It did grow a little bit but the growth for 3 years is really disappointing. I watch YouTube videos almost everyday on how to create a hair regimen because I believe I don’t even have one. My hair is always in styles like box braids and crochet braids. I hear protective styling is very good to help grow hair but nice my hair is short most styles won’t look good. Especially since I’m starting high school in a couple of months I will not want anyone to see my natural hair because it’s one of my insecurities. I just need help on how to create a regimen because all I do to my hair is Shampoo+ conditioner on Saturday and then I usually put it back into braids and then I leave it alone which I shouldn’t. I need your help!! I want my hair to grow but can I do it while it’s in box braids?
Tell someone (husband, boyfriend, sister, friend, etc.) about your health or fitness goals today. If the people you surround yourself with know what you're doing and your plan for accomplishing it, they'll be more likely to support you and not ask you to do things that would impede your progress. (Also consider using an online support group to help you reach your goals!)
Anyone with Afro-textured hair knows that it tends to have a mind of its own. Especially when you consider that it's not uncommon for folks with that type of texture to have more than one curl pattern growing from their scalps. You might have looser curls in the back and tighter coils in the front. You may have hair that wants to frizz at your crown but is super defined at your temples. It can get confusing. But fortunately, there are loads of hair-care products out that will help keep your 'fro looking fabulous and your hair super healthy — no matter what it wants to do with itself. We've rounded up the best of everything you need: Leave-in conditioners, oils, gels, shampoos, wide-tooth combs, and oh so much more. Click through for the 27 hair products folks with highly textured hair depend on to keep their strands looking like absolute perfection.
Styling and caring for curly and natural hair can feel like a never-ending science class full of A/B tests, experiments, and controls. Depending on the day, the weather, what position you slept in, and what mood your curls wake up in, the texture and pattern of your hair can drastically change overnight. This is why, when someone with similar hair to your own recommends a product, it can feel like getting the answers to a test.

Thanks for sharing your experience! Based on what you have shared, you are on the right track. I would like to also encourage you to use products that work best for your hair and that gives you the results you are looking for. A product that works great for one natural maybe completely wrong for another. So I encourage both you and A to experiment and let your hair decide what products you need to use or avoid.


Hi. I really loved your article about how to take care of natural hair but right now I’m transitioning from permed to natural hair, so right now my roots are curly but the rest is straight and my sister told me that my hair is dead, so I was wondering if you knew how to revive it. I also wanted to learn about the process of taking care of your hair. My hair gets dry very fast, and I tend to get split ends very easily. I use argan shampoo and conditioner but I’m not sure it’s the right product for my hair. So my questions are
It’s also important not to use indulgences as a reward for eating healthy. It’s better to own the reality that you consumed an indulgent food and that it has an assigned place in your healthy life than to justify its consumption because you ate well all week long. If indulgent choices still elicit guilt, you might ask yourself if your eating plan is too restrictive.
Hi Missqeetee – On average, it is estimated that hair grows about 1/2 inch per month. This means that (if you’re the average person) your will have the possibly of 1/2 inch of growth per month that will be natural hair. It really depends on how long your hair is to determine how long it will take to grow out the relaxer (along with the growth rate). Take your current length and divide it by 1/2. This will give you a good estimate. This doesn’t account for the amount of length actually retained, which could be less than 1/2 inch per month.

Comparison of patients who have maintained their weight loss more than re-gainers shows that the subjects in first group stay late less at night, have increased physical activity after weight loss, drink less sugar sweetened beverages, eat less calorie from protein, and they have more emotional support. Losing more weight during weight loss, monitoring weight, and choosing healthy foods are supposed to be important factors for successful weight maintenance.[13] The calorie intake of those who do not gain weight is less than obese and overweight people.[28] Other habits consist of using less fat and refined grains, while consuming more fiber, whole grains, vegetables, and fruits.[29]
I have been a natural for about 3 years now and my hair looks like I just big chopped it. It did grow a little bit but the growth for 3 years is really disappointing. I watch YouTube videos almost everyday on how to create a hair regimen because I believe I don’t even have one. My hair is always in styles like box braids and crochet braids. I hear protective styling is very good to help grow hair but nice my hair is short most styles won’t look good. Especially since I’m starting high school in a couple of months I will not want anyone to see my natural hair because it’s one of my insecurities. I just need help on how to create a regimen because all I do to my hair is Shampoo+ conditioner on Saturday and then I usually put it back into braids and then I leave it alone which I shouldn’t. I need your help!! I want my hair to grow but can I do it while it’s in box braids?
I had a long conversation with a fellow 3C-er at Curlfest about this product. This styler can be used for almost anything and everything, but if you’re looking for smooth, stretched curls, the key is knowing how to use it. Liberally apply this from roots to ends on soaking wet hair (not damp!) and it’ll lock in whatever twist-out your heart desires with zero stickiness.
The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is one of the diets that have been studied for weight maintenance. This diet includes consuming more vegetables, fruits, and low-fat dairy products. Following this diet helps patients to achieve[35,36] and maintain weight loss and this effect has been related to dairy products rather than fiber.[37]
We like to focus on taking action during your natural hair journey. You have to implement the things that we discuss to really see improvements in your hair. Taking action is the best way to receive benefit from Curl Centric. We try to thoroughly explain concepts and give you very specific ways to take action. We also encourage you to leave comments on articles and respond to comments and questions from other naturals.
Anyone with Afro-textured hair knows that it tends to have a mind of its own. Especially when you consider that it's not uncommon for folks with that type of texture to have more than one curl pattern growing from their scalps. You might have looser curls in the back and tighter coils in the front. You may have hair that wants to frizz at your crown but is super defined at your temples. It can get confusing. But fortunately, there are loads of hair-care products out that will help keep your 'fro looking fabulous and your hair super healthy — no matter what it wants to do with itself. We've rounded up the best of everything you need: Leave-in conditioners, oils, gels, shampoos, wide-tooth combs, and oh so much more. Click through for the 27 hair products folks with highly textured hair depend on to keep their strands looking like absolute perfection.

A low carbohydrate diet, high MUFA diet, high carbohydrate-low GI diet, high carbohydrate-low GI diet plus intensive support or nurse support, and low CHO / Pro diet have no major effects on the maintenance of weight loss in comparison with a low-fat diet, high protein-low GI diet, high MUFA diet plus intensive support or nurse support, and high CHO / Pro diet, respectively.[18,19,20,21]

Comparison of patients who have maintained their weight loss more than re-gainers shows that the subjects in first group stay late less at night, have increased physical activity after weight loss, drink less sugar sweetened beverages, eat less calorie from protein, and they have more emotional support. Losing more weight during weight loss, monitoring weight, and choosing healthy foods are supposed to be important factors for successful weight maintenance.[13] The calorie intake of those who do not gain weight is less than obese and overweight people.[28] Other habits consist of using less fat and refined grains, while consuming more fiber, whole grains, vegetables, and fruits.[29]
2. SHAMPOO MINDFULLY. Yes, you still need to shampoo regularly to keep your scalp and hair clean- but you can lengthen the time between washes to 2, 3, or even 4 weeks. Avoid shampoos that contain sulfates or any of these other harmful ingredients, and opt for a mild, sulfate-free shampoo like this Cleansing Avocado Shampoo. If your hair gets dirty more often, alternate shampoo with cowash or follow shampoo with an apple cider vinegar rinse. Wash your hair in sections to prevent tangles.
I agree with David (9th July comment) with regard to diet. Whole grains can indeed have the effect of spiking blood sugar (whole grain bread as just one example) and creating gut inflammation, and therefore low-grade, sub-acute inflammation in general. This is the biggest contributor to chronic disease that we are facing, long-term inflammation. The standard food pyramid is, in my opinion, all wrong. I believe we should eat a more Mediterranean diet, and minimise the grain-based carbohydrates, and the sugars. Then we are considerably further down the track towards a healthy diet that promotes longevity. Of course, all of the other factors mentioned are important as well, but what we put into our mouths is probably the most important, given the skyrocketing rates of obesity first world countries are facing, and now even asian countries as well, who are well and truly catching up. 
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